Radiance A3 Frontier and other SMARTWATCH SCAMS on the INTERNET: BEWARE!

Smartwatch SCAM moving through the Internet from bogus websites offering a Radiance A3 Frontier (or other name brand) Smartwatch for super cheap prices. BEWARE! You can loose your money, or, at a minimum, spend hours documenting claims through PayPal or your credit card company to try and get a refund.

Learn more by checking this site:

Jump to about Page 11 or so where the actual watches are starting to show up at peoples' doorstep and read what they have received.

DON'T BE SCAMMED! Buy form legitimate sources. When in doubt, check the buying links under the product reviews you see here.

Also, follow the progress of those who are trying to get their money back. Learn what they have to do, how long it takes, and what lessons they have learned.

You can leave comments below, but the best thing would be if you leave them on the XDA Forum instead as that is a focused community.

NOTE: Same product listing appears here:

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Comment (37)

    1. Congrats! Just don’t buy this watch. You’ll be sent a useless $10 watch for $50, but because they sent you something resembling a watch, it will take a long time and extra effort on your part to get your money back. They are counting on most folks giving up and writing off the $50. Just don’t do it. I know you won’t, but I’m hoping others reading this who are tempted also don’t do it.

      1. A mí me ha pasado lo mismo. He sido tonto en esperar que es de verdad una ganga y la ganga ha sido para ellos ya que me han cobrado 43 € y me han enviado un reloj pésimo que no creo que vale más de 10€. Ahora a ver si puedo recuperar el dinero ya que he abierto una disputa en PayPal. Nunca más me engañan,ni ellos ni ningún otro vendedor

    1. That’s EXACTLY why it is important to check what other folks who order actually receive before ordering yourself. The XDA forums are an excellent resource. Just search on whatever watch catches your attention followed by XDA and see if anyone has opened a forum on it. I do it all the time.

  1. Thank you for the public service announcement! Hopefully, everyone who is even considering this scam sees this first.

    1. Thanks. It felt the right thing to do after seeing how many folks were duped by the low price. Somebody’s got to ring the alarm. Like you, I just hope those considering this check out the XDA forum of others that tried to buy.

    1. Link for what, the bogus watch? Not going to give you that, but if you follow the XDA link in the show notes, you’ll find the links to several fake sites that others have bought from only to be disappointed.

  2. I’m getting the link for this watch on Facebook & whenever I play words with friends. I even left a comment on there Facebook page asking them if there video isn’t just the video for the Samsung Frontier. Of course they haven’t replied, but why would they.
    Keep up the good work

    1. Well now you know. If there’s any way you can post in a way others can see (highly unlikely considering the scam they are attempting to pull) PLEASE offer a *hint* that it may not be legit (so they don’t directly pull your comment down). Thinking twice before committing may save many folks from frustration.

    1. I agree. That’s why it’s important to expose it early before it is extrapolated to all Chinese smartwatches.

  3. +SmartWatch Ticks
    Great video! Thank you for helping to raise awareness of these scumbag sites!

    This is an absolute epidemic, especially on Facebook. I’ve done some pretty extensive research on these types of sites/pages & it is a multi-faceted scam with many elements involved. As best I can gather the scam goes as follows.

    Element 1: – Advertising
    They very much offer a “too good to be true” scenario, usually for between $20 & $80. They sometimes use official advertising (Samsung, Tag Heuer, Huawei, even the Kingwear KW88 & DT. No1 D5 promo videos etc) in a video & it is, overwhelmingly so, NOT what they are selling anyway? Unfortunately, some people fall for it without doing due dilligence.
    Element 2: – PayPal
    There are those who see PayPal & figure if it doesn’t pan out to be whats advertised they’ll take that route to recoup their losses but then, by my estimate, theres the 10 – 20% of people who use credit cards & figure its either too difficult to get their money back or not worth the effort. In the meantime, the PayPal complaints come in thick & fast, as do the Facebook page complaints & they get shut down. They then start up again under a new name, usually a thinly veiled variation on the original page (eg: MegaShop, MegaShop1, MegaStore etc) & the cycle starts all over again?
    Element 3: – “Sponsored Scammers”
    The irony is a lot of these scam pages I have seen have “Sponsored Posts” BY FACEBOOK which means nothing more than the fact that someone has paid to have that page, site, video or post advertised on Facebook. Unfortunately some people see that its “Sponsored” by Facebook & mistakenly believe that it is in some way an endorsement… IT ISN’T! It is merely a paid form of advertising on Facebook itself.
    Element 4: The Terms & Conditions.
    I’ve taken the time to read the fine print/terms & conditions on a few of these sites & on some of them, the smarter ones that actually HAVE T&C’s available to view or even find & it is even there in black & white that the picture of what you purchase & what you actually recieve may be very different at their sole discretion so, in some cases, people don’t even get their money back as they have accepted the T&C’s without even realising? Sometimes they abide that you automatically accept the T&C’s by use of the site! These particular operators or scammers, tend to be on the higher end of the purchase price scale, usually between the $59 – $89 mark.

    There are some things to bear in mind when choosing whether or not to make a purchase from one of these sites or pages.

    1: The most obvious red flag is if the promo video doesn’t exactly match the product being sold, forget it immediately! For example, I found one that advertised a Tag Heuer Connected but the link was to a Thor S & KW99. THAT is the most obvious sign something ain’t right, right there. Same goes if the official logo is misspelt or obstructed in some way. For example one of the more recent ones I’ve seen flashed the SAMSUNG logo at the end but had the G blocked by a picture of the product, effectively spelling SAMSUN.
    Another, used the official Tag Heuer logo spelt “Tag Heuor.” Just walk away immediately if you see this.

    2: If you can’t independently find ANY peer reviews not affiliated or connected to the site/page itself, its a scam… PERIOD!

    3: Just because they offer PayPal as a payment option is no guarantee that you will ever see your money again? As I pointed out, an increasing number of these sites/pages include provisions in their T&C’s (something you inherently agree to when you make the purchase) that they may:

    -Change the product you purchase at their sole discretion, without notice or compensation.
    -Choose not to send you anything at all under the guise of “availability.”
    -Accept no liability or responsibility for items not recieved, recieved damaged or not matching the initial purchase.
    -Will only accept returns for refunds if the item is returned in its original, unopened postage package.

    …and the list goes on!
    If you happen to read the T&C’s & they are dubiously unrealistic… forget it!

    4: Do your reseach on the website/domain name etc.
    Things like how old the website is, the registered location of the website, whether its location is being hidden or masked & the overall trust rating of the site usually indicate conclusively whether they are a scam or not.
    Be informed BEFORE commiting to buy. Sites like https://www.scamadviser.com are a great resource in determining whether or not a site/seller is a scam.

    5: As far as Facebook pages go, the best method I’ve found for sorting the genuine sellers from the scammers is if they respond to communications in a timely manner. If they are a GENUINE business, they should be eager to answer any queries or questions you have in order to make the sale. Also, they should have reviews readily accessible in order to show they are a reputable seller. Again, check their “About” section to see how long the page has been running, if its less than 6 – 12 months be weary. If its less than 3 months, don’t even bother! Things like time between posts, the wording used in posts, if its littered with spelling errors… any one of these things should be cause for caution. Any combination of any two or more should be cause to forget it!

    6: – Last but by no means least is, as you said in your video Mr Ticks, the general rule of thumb is if it seems too good to be true then it probably is.
    Just bear all this stuff in mind before you decide to purchase what may turn out to be a Unicorn.
    Stick with reputable sites, companies, business’ & retailers to buy your smartwatch.
    As always, a little dilligence &/or research goes a long way towards preventing heartache in the long run.

    Also remember that scammers have a tendency to either be ahead of the curve as far as laws & regulations go, what the grey areas are but also, adapt very quickly to make changes in order to better scam people out of their money.
    If you do some leg work before deciding to hand over your hard earned, that is always going to be a good thing.

    1. Thanks for your extensive comment, Steven. I’ve pinned it to the top so it will be the first comment in the list. Very well organized, and good advice.

    2. Speaking of spelling errors… “spelt”, really? I believe is is spelled wrong. Yes, I just had to mention it as you did such an excellent job with your well researched comment and information. Please forgive me. :^)

    1. You’re welcome. It takes on a totally different light when you encounter this having been ‘informed’ about it first. Hopefully it will keep that finger off the ‘buy’ button.

  4. Thank you so much for making us aware of this. I was going to buy this watch but u helped me to know its fake. Thanks a lot

  5. I’ve been on the look out for a smart watch for ages! Saw the advert on Facebook and was intreaged! I always do my homework on products! Been watching all your vids. So it became more apparent this watch doesn’t exist! Exist only as a Samsung S3! I unfortunately took the plunge but realised straight after it’s a scam. Your video was a 2wks to late for me lol! I already opened a despute with PayPal. And funnily enough got my money back today! The watch came today too! And it’s a cheap smart watch. Obviously not like in vid! I really hope everyone gets their money back! You live and you learn. Just wish I stuck to my gut feeling! ?

  6. Saved me on bery last second 🙏🏻 I was about to click order button I thought must check on internet is it true or bogus! Thanks again for saving me

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